While most people are familiar with identity theft, most business men and women never think about it happening to them, at least on a professional level. Consider this: if a criminal can learn your business checking account number or the number of your company credit card, they can steal far more from your business than if they had simply knocked down the door and carted off your desk.

The Internet aside, most business and personal identity theft is still the result of stolen wallets and dumpster diving. You should guard your business records closely and be very careful what you throw away. Stop and think for a moment what a criminal might find in the dumpster behind your office.

Theres a good chance that dumpster has, at various times, contained scraps of paper with your social security number, drivers license number, credit card number, old ATM cards, telephone calling cards, and other pieces of vital business information like bank statements, invoices, and purchase orders. A dumpster-diving thief could literally rob your business blind in a matter of hours.

Here are a few ways to protect yourself from business and personal identity theft.

· Never give out your first name, last name, business name, email address, account passwords, credit card numbers, bank account information, PIN number, social security number, or drivers license number.

· Change your online account passwords every 30 days. Believe it or not, a hacker who steals your personal information can guess your online account passwords in about two minutes. If your Charles Schwab online account password is your birthday or the name of your first born or family pet, count on a hacker cracking that code faster than you can say "Bill Gates."

· Never provide personal information in response to an email or telephone call. Just because someone calls and says they are from Dunn & Bradstreet and need to confirm your business information does not mean they are really from Dunn & Bradstreet.

· Never give your business credit card number over the phone to place an order with someone who has called you unsolicited. If you are interested in what they are selling get their number, check out their company, then call them back to place the order.

If you think that you have become the victim of identity theft or think someone is trying to steal your identity or personal information you should report them immediately to the Federal Trade Commission. You will find more information on their website at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft/. For more information on what to do if identity theft happens to you visit http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs17a.htm.

So, if you ever receive an email from PayPal, Amazon, eBay, or any other ecommerce website asking you to update your account information by email you can pretty much bet the farm that it is a scam.

Heres to your success.

Tim Knox, Founder For more information on starting your own online business visit http://www.dropshipwholesale.net, the website for online entrepreneurs.
Identity Theft by Phishing "> Identity Theft by Phishing
Stealing Your Life: The Ultimate Identity Theft Prevention Plan
by Frank W. Abagnale

Stealing Your Life is more frightening than a gory murder mystery. Any one of us, from cradle to grave, is vulnerable to a swindle that can wreck us emotionally, cost us serious money, ruin our credit ratings, and take us years to straighten out. Identity theft is here to stay, and as long as legislators, businesses, law enforcement agencies, and individuals fail to take it seriously, the number of victims will continue to climb.

For thirty-two years, the author has been a law-abiding citizen; his criminal past, famously recounted in the book and film "Catch Me If You Can," is a distant memory. However, he knows how crooks think, and this knowledge has led to a lucrative career as a consultant for the FBI and corporations all over the world in preventing frauds and scams. Abagnale is horrified at how easy and tempting identity theft is for the budding criminal. He calls it "a crook's dream come true."

     

Identity Theft by Phishing

Identity Theft

Identity Theft by Phishing * Identity Theft

Small Business Q & A: Dont Fall For The Latest Internet Identity Theft Scam   
Tim Knox

Q: I use PayPal to accept credit cards for my online collectibles business. I recently received an email that my PayPal account was going to expire in five days if I didnt click a link in the email and give them my PayPal account information. Being naturally paranoid I decided not to give this information and Im happy to say that my PayPal account did not expire. Was this a scam? -- Brenda A.

A: Be thankful that your paranoia kicked in, Brenda, because you were about to fall victim to the scam of the week, this one aimed at the 35 million merchants and individuals who use Paypal.com as their online payment processor.

The email you received was not from PayPal, but from an Internet bad guy behind a forged email address using the PayPal.com domain. You should understand that no reputable online company will ever ask you to provide your account information. Think about it. They already have this information. Why would they ask you to provide it.

Since I use PayPal for several of my online ventures, I, too, received the email in question. The email first seeks to instill fear in you by saying that your PayPal account will be closed if you do not provide personal information. You are then directed to open an attached executable file and enter your PayPal account information and other personal information that PayPal doesnt even require, including your social security number, checking and savings account information, drivers license number, and other personal information that can be used to clean out your PayPal account and perhaps even steal your identity.

If youre not familiar with PayPal, it is a hugely successful, web-based company (purchased by eBay in 2002) that many online retailers and eBay sellers use to accept electronic payments for everything from newsletter subscriptions to consulting services to just about any product for sale on eBay.

The allure of PayPal is that it does not require the seller to have a bank merchant account through which to process credit cards. Anyone with a verifiable email address and bank account can use PayPal and the service can be implemented almost immediately after registering. When someone places an order on a website that uses PayPal for online payments, that customer is directed to PayPal.com to complete the payment process using a credit card or electronic check. The merchant can transfer the money collected in his PayPal account to his checking account any time he likes. Since many larger merchants make this transfer just once a week or so, their PayPal accounts are ripe for the picking from those who have the cunning and lack of ethics required to gain access.

The shear number of PayPal customers is one reason it has become a popular target of scam artists trying to steal personal information from individuals and businesses alike. Identify theft is on the rise. Thanks to the Internet stealing someones identity has never been easier. At any given moment, there are any number of Internet thieves using all manner of high tech wizardry to steal personal and business information from unsuspecting souls, and many times they can gain access to this information simply by asking the person to provide it through fraudulent means.

The PayPal scam is just the latest in a long line of sophisticated attempts to steal personal information through online means, Amazon, eBay, Dell Computer, and many others have been the brunt of many such scams in recent years.

Identity theft is whats known as "a knowledge crime," which means that the criminal doesnt have to break into your house to rob you blind. If you have a bank account and a social security number, you are susceptible to identity theft.

While most people are familiar with identity theft, most business men and women never think about it happening to them, at least on a professional level. Consider this: if a criminal can learn your business checking account number or the number of your company credit card, they can steal far more from your business than if they had simply knocked down the door and carted off your desk.

The Internet aside, most business and personal identity theft is still the result of stolen wallets and dumpster diving. You should guard your business records closely and be very careful what you throw away. Stop and think for a moment what a criminal might find in the dumpster behind your office.

Theres a good chance that dumpster has, at various times, contained scraps of paper with your social security number, drivers license number, credit card number, old ATM cards, telephone calling cards, and other pieces of vital business information like bank statements, invoices, and purchase orders. A dumpster-diving thief could literally rob your business blind in a matter of hours.

Here are a few ways to protect yourself from business and personal identity theft.

· Never give out your first name, last name, business name, email address, account passwords, credit card numbers, bank account information, PIN number, social security number, or drivers license number.

· Change your online account passwords every 30 days. Believe it or not, a hacker who steals your personal information can guess your online account passwords in about two minutes. If your Charles Schwab online account password is your birthday or the name of your first born or family pet, count on a hacker cracking that code faster than you can say "Bill Gates."

· Never provide personal information in response to an email or telephone call. Just because someone calls and says they are from Dunn & Bradstreet and need to confirm your business information does not mean they are really from Dunn & Bradstreet.

· Never give your business credit card number over the phone to place an order with someone who has called you unsolicited. If you are interested in what they are selling get their number, check out their company, then call them back to place the order.

If you think that you have become the victim of identity theft or think someone is trying to steal your identity or personal information you should report them immediately to the Federal Trade Commission. You will find more information on their website at http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft/. For more information on what to do if identity theft happens to you visit http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs17a.htm.

So, if you ever receive an email from PayPal, Amazon, eBay, or any other ecommerce website asking you to update your account information by email you can pretty much bet the farm that it is a scam.

Heres to your success.

Tim Knox, Founder For more information on starting your own online business visit http://www.dropshipwholesale.net, the website for online entrepreneurs.

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Bogus Tweet Fears Dog AFL (Herald Sun)
PLAYERS have been urged to report fake Twitter accounts as internet identity theft continues to dog the AFL.

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Gone Phishing: Jam Band Gets Closer To Coming To Town (Telluride Daily Planet)
It seems like Phish could happen. Yesterday in a special meeting, the Telluride Parks and Recreation Commission gave the nod to promoters hoping to use Town Park for two nights in August to host the iconic...

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Tim Knox as the president and CEO of two successful technology companies: B2Secure Inc., a Web-based hiring management software company; and Digital Graphiti Inc., a software development company. Tim is also the founder of dropshipwholesale.net, an ebusiness dedicated to the success of online entrepreneurs. http://www.dropshipwholesale.net http://www.smallbusinessqa.com

Index of Articles about Indentity Theft

What Other Authors say about Indentify Theft

Protect Yourself from Identity Theft by Scott Hawksworth

Millions of Americans use credit cards, take out money from savings and checking accounts, write checks, and open new bank accounts everyday. By completing these everyday tasks, many Americans put themselves...

Identity Theft Resource - Top 5 Public & Private Websites by Carl LaFresnaye

The United States government and consumer organizations have compiled some of the best identity theft resource materials around. Many of them are available as virtual handbooks in PDF format at these three...

Identity Theft: Stop It Now! by Matthew Keegan

You may be a victim of identity theft and not even know it. Thieves may have secured important information about you and are using it without you knowing what they are doing. By the time you discover their...

Identity Theft Prevention Tip - Stop the Thief in His Tracks! by Carl LaFresnaye

Perhaps the most practical identity theft prevention tip is discovering just where your lifestyle and habits are most vulnerable to attacks. If you can stop a thief in his tracks, it will save you loads...

Identity Theft by Sara Chambers

Identity theft is a growing problem in the United States, occurring in small towns and cities alike. Identity theft, as defined by the federal government, refers to the use of another person's identity...

Rising Identity Theft Crimes by Tony Robinson

Each year identity theft is on the increase according to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Since 2004, a shocking rate of eleven "million" have fallen victim of identity theft. At the same time, experts...

14 Steps You Can Take to Prevent Identity Theft by Etienne Gibbs

Becoming a major epidemic, Identity Theft occurs when a criminal uses another person's personal information to take on that person's identity. Identity theft includes the misuse of a Social Security number,...

Stop Identity Theft by Tony Robinson

Reading articles on identity theft may not sound appealing to you, but if you think that you are not subject to becoming the next target then you are fooling your self and setting your self up as an easy...

Social Security Identity Theft - What Thieves Can Do and How You Can Stop Them by Carl LaFresnaye

Social Security identity theft figures in many complaints received by the Federal Trade Commission since it gives the perpetrator the flexibility in terms of the kind of identity fraud he can commit. Unlike...

Identity theft basics by Mansi Gupta

Identity theft is one of the latest buzzword within our society in recent times. Identity theft refers to hiding one's original identity and illegally misusing someone else's identity. The person pretending...

Identity Theft Tips by Tony Robinson

Identity theft is an ongoing crime, that in the year of 2004 alone more than eleven million victims lost their identity. Now that we are in recession, the world is in chaos more so than ever and many people...

Identity Theft - Resources to Help You Once It Has Happened by Pamela Bruce

Identity theft could happen to anyone. Someone gets hold of important information, such as your name, credit card information and social security number and uses this to make online purchases or apply...


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